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CEDAR PROTOCOLS

To ensure the health and well-being of all students, Cedar International School has the following health protols in place. Please contact the school if you have any questions.

Head lice Protocol

What are head lice? Head lice are small, wingless insect parasites that live on the human head, laying their eggs (nits) on the hair shaft, causing an itchy scalp.

School screening;

  • At the beginning of every term, all students will undergo a scalp examination by a designated member of staff.
  • Any student seen to have live lice or eggs (or nits) will be given a parent notification letter at the end of the day, along with literature advising of treatment protocols.
  • In serious infestations, the parent will be called to collect the child during school hours.
  • In isolated cases of head lice, the class parents will be notified.
  • In school wide cases, notification to the school community will be given.

In event of head lice being identified;

  • Parents / guardians are required to send the box top from the head lice shampoo or treatment as proof of treatment.
  • After the initial treatment, the student will be re-screened before returning to the classroom. Eggs may still be present, but no live lice should be identified.
  • Student will be re-screened 7 days after initial identification. If live lice or nits are detected, repeat of the above procedures.

Recommendations to reduce risk of infestation;

  • Hair should be washed regularly and appear clean.
  • Hair should be combed or brushed daily.
  • Students should tie long hair into a braid or ponytail so that it is off the shoulders.
  • Students should avoid sharing of hats, hair bands, scarves, scrunches etc.
  • Sleepovers should be avoided until infestation is controlled.
  • Students should be advised against close physical contact with heads.

Class procedures to reduce risk of infestation;

  • Students are assigned individual hooks but hats will be placed inside bags.
  • All dress-up clothing, stuffed animals, dolls, etc. will be bagged for at least 10 days in the event of an infestation.
  • Carpets and rugs in classrooms will be vacuumed daily.

Pinworm Protocol

What are Pinworms?

Pinworms (or threadworms or Enterobiasis) are the most common form of intestinal worm infection and are most prevalent in younger children. Symptoms may be absent but more commonly intense itching around the bottom at night. Restlessness or general disturbance of sleep may occur. Detection can be through either visual inspection of the area first thing in the morning or by providing a stool sample for laboratory analysis.

School screening;

  • Although screening is not routinely undertaken, any student reported to have a suspected case of Pinworms will have their parents contacted via telephone.
  • All students reported to have had Pinworms will require treatment with an anthelmintic medicine, such as Mebendazole, in consultation with a physician.
  • In isolated cases of Pinworm, the class parents will be notified and advised of symptoms and treatment.
  • In school wide cases, notification to the school community will be given.

In event Pinworm is identified;

  • Students are required to remain out of school until treatment has been administered.
  • Should the infection be causing discomfort or irritation to the student, the student should remain out of school until irritation ceases.
  • All members of the same household should be treated simultaneously to avoid cross-contamination. Further treatment may be required.
  • Infective eggs can contaminate bed linen, towels, food and drink etc and the reinfection rate can be high.

Ringworm Protocol

What is Ringworm?

Ringworm, (or Tinea corporis,) is a fungal skin infection.  A parasite or worm does not cause this relatively common skin infection. A red scaly lesion develops with rings of vesicle with the characteristic central clearing. It causes intense itching. It commonly occurs on the scalp as well as other body areas.

School screening;

  • Although screening is not routinely undertaken, any student seen to have a suspected case of ringworm will have their parents contacted via telephone.
  • If the area can be covered with a dressing or plaster, the student will be allowed to continue attendance, until a medical consultation can be sought at the earliest opportunity.
  • If the area cannot be covered, or the infection is widespread parents will be called for collection.
  • In isolated cases of ringworm, the class parents will be notified and advised of symptoms and treatment.
  • In school wide cases, notification to the school community will be given.

In event ringworm being identified;

  • Students are required to remain out of school until treatment with an anti-fungal agent has been administered for 24 hours, unless the area can be completely covered with a dressing and remain intact.
  • Should the infection be causing discomfort or irritation to the student, the student should remain out of school until irritation ceases.

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